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Blog Posts (69)

  • The 'Community' in Our Community Forest:

    Returning to the community forest is our seasonal Forest Technician, Ashlyn Yanciw. Ashlyn just completed a Diploma in Environmental Assessment and Restoration from Lethbridge College. Also returning is Erich Endersby who just completed his Diploma in Forest Technology from Selkirk College. Erich accepted a permanent full time position with the community forest and will now be registering with the Forest Professionals of BC to obtain his designation as a Registered Forest Technologist. The community forest has also hired Eva Sommerfeld who will be working as our newest forestry summer student. * We will share more about these three Creston Community Forest team members throughout the summer.

  • Join us at our Open House

    Save the date! Join us at our Open House: Saturday, May 25th., 9am-1pm, Creston Valley Farmers' Market At the beginning of each wildfire season, the Creston Community Forest and partners host an Open House for the community. The Creston Valley FireSmart Resiliency Committee will attend the Open House hosted by the Creston Community Forest and the Creston Valley Farmers Market. The goal of the Open House is to bring together wildfire and wildlife practitioners and educators, government representatives, local forestry licensees and community members to discuss, learn, share and explore what work is happening in the Creston Valley and how you can play a part in making your home, community, and forest more resilient to wildfire. Head to our webpage for more information: https://www.crestoncommunityforest.com/crestonvalleyfiresmartresiliencycommittee

  • Creston Community Forest Trail Etiquette

    1. Dirtbikes and Quads are not permitted on any Community Forest Trails designated as non-motorized. 2. Important Notice: No Motorcycles Allowed on the Pack Trail To protect the safety of all trail users, motorcycles are not permitted on the Pack Trail. Thank you for your cooperation in keeping our trails safe and enjoyable for everyone! 3. Leash Up! Dogs Must Be on Their Leash A friendly reminder to all dog owners using the Pack Trail: please keep your furry friends on a leash. This helps protect wildlife, other trail users, and ensures everyone can enjoy the trail safely. 4. Yield to Horses When encountering horses on the Pack Trail, please yield the right of way. Horses can be easily spooked by sudden movements or loud noises, so approach them calmly and give them plenty of space to pass. * Also, please do not take down the signs at each trailhead or in the trailhead Kiosks. Thank you for your cooperation and Happy Hiking!

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Other Pages (23)

  • Projects | Creston Community Forest, BC

    Projects 2024 Projects Goat Mountain Details Mt. Thompson Details General Project Phases ​ Phase 1: Planning Collating and analyzing relevant data to help develop plans that balance values and are aligned with our guiding principles. ​ Phase 2: Collaboration Open collaborative discussions with the Creston Valley community, including area residents, First Nations and the Creston Valley FireSmart Resiliency Committee . Key points will be highlighted in our newsletter, on social media, and at open houses. ​ Phase 3: Prioritization Identification of proposed and prioritized projects in the community forest will be developed over time. ​ Phase 4: Implementation Completing the plans from field development through to reforestation and long term monitoring. ​ ​ Resources / Links Guiding Principles Management Plan Forest Stewardship Plan Policy Manual STAY IN THE LOOP! Sign up for our newsletter below to stay updated on upcoming trail work, events, and more. Don't miss out on the latest news, opportunities to get involved and join our online community to be the first to know. Creston Community Forest Newsletter sign up link: Yes, I want the Newsletter

  • Projects | Creston Community Forest, BC

    Projects Our 2024 Project Objectives ​ Ensuring a Resilient Forest and Community ​ The Creston Community Forest envisions healthy forests with social, ecological, and economic benefits. We prioritize non-timber resources and local community input in our harvesting plans to make this vision a reality. Our community forest allows the Creston Valley to guide land-use decisions, respecting local interest and ecological integrity. Our guiding principles outline our long-term goals: Manage forest resources for long-term community benefit. Operate the community forest as a viable forestry enterprise. Educate the public on the community forest and Creston's forest management. Enhance partnerships with local First Nations. Develop a timber harvesting schedule for the next 5–10 years. These goals guide our planning and decision-making, ensuring we prioritize actions based on community needs and reflect local values and concerns. Wildfire Risk Reduction to Forests and Community The Goat Mountain area where community intermingles with the natural environment is called the wildland urban interface. Mountainous geography and water restrict most areas and this challenges emergency response planning. As our climate changes, our communities are increasingly aware of this risk, and interested in seeing it addressed. As a community-led organization with a forest stewardship mandate, this is a high priority for the Creston Community Forest. ​ To follow community forest guidelines, Angela French, (RFT, Creston Community Forest Planning and Development Supervisor) shared the proposed Cutting Permit for this year. You will find the goals for the proposed areas, with a strong emphasis on reducing fuel loads. You will also find maps highlighting the areas for your further understanding of the Wildfire Risk Reduction Project on Goat Mountain. How to reduce the risk of wildfire spreading through the Community Forest Email Us Your Questions Maps for Proposed Areas The four phases of this project over the year includes: ​ Phase 1: Planning This will involve analyzing relevant data, such as old growth and ecologically important areas to be protected, to build a Fuel Management Plan across the Community Forest’s operating area. This information will be used to inform decisions to show where wildfire threat, spread, and vulnerability risks are greatest. ​ Phase 2: Collaboration Discussing the findings with the Creston Valley Community, including area residents, First Nations and the Creston Valley FireSmart Resiliency Committee. The information generated by this process will be shared for discussion with community on priority areas and next steps. We will highlight key points in our newsletter, on social media, host an informational open house to share findings, and reach out to community groups in areas with proposed mitigation projects to gain community input into how we should proceed with the findings. ​ Phase 3: Prioritization Identification of proposed and prioritized Wildfire Risk Reduction projects in the Community Forest. A series of proposed risk reduction projects will be developed over time. Each proposed project area will be identified including such information as threat and risk levels, and forest characteristics. ​ Phase 4: Implementation Completing the field development, cutting permit development and treatments to implement the Fuel Management Plan over time. ​ ​ Resources / Links Guiding Principles Management Plan Forest Stewardship Plan Policy Manual History Creston Community Forest’s history can be traced back to January of 1996, when the B.C. government announced the availability of a Forest Licence to harvest 15,000 cubic metres annually in areas near Creston, including the Arrow Creek watershed. Concerns about water quality led five Creston organizations to apply for the licence. They were granted a 15-year forest licence, forming the Creston Valley Forest Corporation. ​ In October 2008, the Creston Valley Forest Corporation received a Probationary Community Forest Agreement, which later became a 25-year community forest agreement, leading to the formation of the Creston Community Forest. In 2016, the community forest expanded its area and saw an increase in the Allowable Annual Cut, which now stands at 25,000 cubic metres annually. This rich history showcases the power of community collaboration and the dedication of those who strive to balance environmental stewardship with sustainable economic practices. STAY IN THE LOOP! Sign up for our newsletter below to stay updated on upcoming trail work, events, and more. Don't miss out on the latest news, opportunities to get involved and join our online community to be the first to know. Creston Community Forest Newsletter sign up link: Yes, I want the Newsletter

  • Home | Creston Community Forest, BC

    Managing Our Community Forest for Fut ure Generations ​ Nestled between the Purcell and Selkirk Mountains, w e are a not-for-profit forest corporation managing the Creston Community Forest. Our focus is forest management, education, recreation and community resiliency for future generations. Sign Up for Monthly Newsletter What is a Community Forest? A Community Forest is an area-based forest tenure awarded by government to communities to enhance their local control over forest management. Community forests create local jobs and keep profits within the community. We manage over 21,000 hectares of land with primary objectives to promote a healthy, sustainable community forest ecosystem, while fostering a thriving timber industry that benefits the entire Creston Community. ​ Creating local jobs, supporting industries, and generating revenue that directly benefits our community, our goal is to create a resilient, sustainable forest for our community to enjoy and engage the next generation of stewards who will shape the future of our forests. FOREST MANAGEMENT ​ Committed to managing our community forest for future generations : innovative and sustainable logging, preserving healthy forests, continuous recreational and employment benefits, wildlife habitat enhancement, and wildfire risk reduction. More Info EDUCATION Dedicated to expanding the concepts of a healthy forest: benefits of a healthy ecosystem, innovative techniques used in forestry, biodiversity, wildlife and watersheds, and our need to sustain healthy practices in the forest. More Info RECREATION Creating safe spaces to enhance your hiking experience: bridge development, trailhead kiosk with maps, developed trails, lookout points, maintenance on existing trails, over 35 kilometres of trails and planning for future trails. ​ More Info Sign Up for Monthly Newsletter Latest News The 'Community' in Our Community Forest: Join us at our Open House Creston Community Forest Trail Etiquette More News & Stories Click HERE How to Get Involved Forest Stewardship Plan

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